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Cane and Rattan
Weaving Services

Binding Cane or Rattan Weaving

Binding Cane or Rattan

Binding Cane or Rattan Weaving

Blind Cane / French Cane

Blind Cane / French Cane

Blind Cane / French Cane

Hand Woven Cane

Hand Cane - Traditional Seven-Step Hand Caning

(with drilled holes)

Hand Woven Cane

Hanging Medallions Woven in Cane Sunshine Pattern

Hanging Medallions Woven in Cane Sunshine Pattern

Hanging Medallions Woven in Cane Sunshine Pattern

pre woven Cesca chair

Pre Woven Cane

Pre Woven Cane Repalcement

Riempie Chairs

Riempie Chairs

Riempie Chairs

Rising Sun Cane Pattern

Rising Sun Cane Pattern

Rising Sun Cane Pattern

Setting Sun Cane Pattern

Setting Sun Cane Pattern

Setting Sun Cane Pattern

Specialty Handwoven Cane,
Pre-Woven Cane, and Rattan Furniture Repair

Caning is a method of weaving chair seats, backs, and other furniture, whether the piece is new or the weaving is being restored with material derived from the rattan plant.

Many of the seats, backs, and shelves can be removed and mailed to Caning Canada for caning. Check out our shipping page for more information.

 

The rattan vine is native to Indonesia, the Philippines, and Malaysia.  The vines typically grow 100 to 300 ft in length.

 

Before export, the rattan stems are cut to uniform lengths, and the bark is removed in narrow strips. The rattan vine looks similar to bamboo. Rattan is a solid flexible vine which needs support, whereas bamboo is hollow and holds itself upright.

Some folks confuse furniture or chair caning with wickerwork. To clarify, chair caning is the craft of applying rattan cane or rattan peel to a piece of furniture, such as the backs or seats of chairs. Wicker or wickerwork is the craft of weaving materials such as natural willow or rattan reeds and other manufactured and paper-based cords like Danish cord or Fibre rush.

 

Cane is durable and typically left in its natural state and will colour beautifully as it ages.

Cane is a beautiful eco-friendly material, providing a light and airy feel for a room while still being modern and stylish.

Cane is traditionally woven into different webbed patterns utilizing various weaving methods, as detailed below.

Cane Furniture Care & Use

Cane can be cleaned using a wood soap; an example is Murphy's Oil Soap and a soft cloth. Do not use the chair for two days to fully dry the cane.

 

Oil the cane on your furniture once or twice a year using lemon or teak oil. Apply the oil to the porous bottom side of the cane and wipe off the excess after 15 minutes.

 

Avoid putting cane furniture in hot, dry or sunny rooms. Also, avoid placing cane furniture near heat vents as it will dry out the cane and make it brittle.

 

Never stand on a cane chair. Cane is extremely strong when weight is evenly distributed across the surface.

The cane stretches when you sit on it, which allows for the stress of even weight distribution. Over time the stretch will sag. When the cane loses its ability to stretch, it will begin to break along the chair from or within the sag. 

 

You can extend the life of your cane furniture by wetting the underside of the chair with a warm wet towel and then letting it dry to tighten the sag. Do not use the chair for two days to let it fully dry and tighten.

 

The cane doesn't need to be sealed or stained as it will naturally colour with age. If you choose to stain the cane, use an oil-based stain on the top side of the cane, not the porous bottom of the cane. The bottom side is used to oil your cane to retain moisture. 

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